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Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Be weather aware

Downtown OKC Skyline

Spring is right around the corner and with that comes baseball, the Oklahoma City Festival of the Arts and anything else that can be enjoyed outside. However, spring can also bring severe weather. While it doesn’t happen as often as you might think, if you are new to OKC then it doesn’t hurt to be aware of the severe weather warning system in our metro.

  • Severe thunderstorm watch
    What it means:
    The potential exists for the development of thunderstorms that might produce large hail and/or damaging winds.
    What to do: Go about your normal activities, but be aware of the weather. Listen to the National Weather Service’s weather radio or local stations for further weather updates.
  • Severe thunderstorm warning
    What it means:
    A severe thunderstorm – meaning a storm with large hail and/or damaging winds – is occurring or is imminent.
    What to do: Move indoors or to a place of safety.
  • Tornado watch
    What it means:
    Conditions are favorable for severe thunderstorms to form, and these storms may be capable of producing a tornado.
    What to do: Go about your normal activities, but be aware of the weather. Listen to the National Weather Service’s weather radio or local stations for further weather updates.
  • PDS tornado watch
    What it means:
    This type of tornado watch is issued when the National Weather Service deems a storm to be a “particularly dangerous situation” with the potential for multiple strong or violent tornadoes. Of the tornado watches issued across the U.S. from 1996-2005, only 7 percent were classified as PDS tornado watches.
    What to do: Go about your normal activities, but be aware of the weather. Listen to the National Weather Service’s weather radio or local stations for further weather updates.
  • Tornado warning
    What it means:
    A tornado has been spotted or intense low-level rotation has been indicated on weather radar.
    What to do: According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), you should take cover immediately in an enclosed, windowless area on the lowest level of your home or office.

It is a good idea to have a severe weather plan in place for you and your family.

weather
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Winter wonderland†

Myriad Gardens in the snow

We like to brag about the weather in Oklahoma City. Most days are sunny and clear, and we get to enjoy all four seasons. That being said, once in a blue moon, we will get hit with a winter storm.

While it is nice if you get a day to break out your snow tube, sometimes you do have to get around. The good news is the City of Oklahoma City does an excellent job of maintaining snow routes if we get snow. The routes allow you to access all parts of Oklahoma City and you can find them here.

We recommend you go ahead and bookmark that page because in addition to snow routes, you can find winter driving tips, regional snow routes, definitions for winter weather advisories and so much more. In our experience, you probably won’t need any of it, but as the old saying goes “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.”

weather
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, November 14, 2017

A Better Life: climate

Family enjoying outdoor BBQ

If you are someone who enjoys four seasons, Oklahoma City is the place for you. The Summers are sunny, falls are crisp, winters give you plenty of excuses for hot chocolate and the springs bring plenty of rain. Weather in Oklahoma changes with the seasons, providing a climate that has a little something in store for everyone.

Oklahoma City experiences each of the four seasons distinctly, while enjoying clear skies (65 percent of the time), clean air and an average annual temperature of 60 degrees. Whether you are a resident or visitor, time spent in Oklahoma City will leave you with a favorite season.

To learn more about what to expect out of weather in Oklahoma and how to prepare, head over to the Climate section of www.abetterlifeokc.com.

weather
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Stay weather aware this spring

OKC Downtown Skyline

Spring in Oklahoma City brings a lot of activities that we look forward to each year – the blooms at Myriad Gardens, patio season at our favorite restaurants, the start of the OKC Dodgers season – but it also brings with it an increased likelihood of severe weather.

Last year OKC adopted a new tornado siren policy. These changes make it more important than ever to immediately take shelter and get more information when you hear a siren. In previous years, OKC sounded all of its sirens within a county affected by a National Weather Service (NWS) tornado warning. For example, if the NWS issued a tornado warning in Cleveland County, Oklahoma City sounded all of its Cleveland County sirens. As a result, people could hear sirens far away from tornado threats.

The important new policy change divides OKC into zones. When the NWS issues a tornado warning, only the sirens in zones covered by the warning will sound. Residents and visitors don’t need to know what zone they’re in, only to immediately take shelter and get more information if they hear a siren. Oklahoma City will continue to test its sirens every Saturday at noon unless there is a threat of severe weather.

Emergency management officials recommend you have more than one way to get warnings and other information about storms. Information sources include NOAA weather radios, smartphone apps, television news, traditional radios and online news and weather websites.

People with disabilities can receive alerts and warnings from the city’s Accessible Hazard Alert System (AHAS). Go to http://okc.ahasalerts.com/ to learn more.

weather
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



A guide to watches and warnings

Bricktown Canal

If you aren’t familiar with the categories for severe weather, watching a meteorology report can be a little confusing. Here is a no-frills guide to severe weather reporting.

Severe thunderstorm watch
What it means:
The potential exists for the development of thunderstorms that might produce large hail and/or damaging winds.
What to do: Go about your normal activities, but be aware of the weather. Listen to the National Weather Service’s weather radio or local stations for further weather updates.

Severe thunderstorm warning
What it means:
A severe thunderstorm – meaning a storm with large hail and/or damaging winds – is occurring or is imminent.
What to do: Move indoors or to a place of safety.

Tornado watch
What it means:
Conditions are favorable for severe thunderstorms to form, and these storms may be capable of producing a tornado.
What to do: Go about your normal activities, but be aware of the weather. Listen to the National Weather Service’s weather radio or local stations for further weather updates.  

PDS tornado watch
What it means:
This type of tornado watch is issued when the National Weather Service deems a storm to be a “particularly dangerous situation” with the potential for multiple strong or violent tornadoes. Of the tornado watches issued across the U.S. from 1996-2005, only 7 percent were classified as PDS tornado watches.
What to do: Go about your normal activities, but be aware of the weather. Listen to the National Weather Service’s weather radio or local stations for further weather updates.  

Tornado warning
What it means:
A tornado has been spotted or intense low-level rotation has been indicated on weather radar.
What to do: According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), you should take cover immediately in an enclosed, windowless area on the lowest level of your home or office.

It is a good idea to have a severe weather plan in place for you and your family. The National Weather Service in Norman has put together a handy-dandy guide to make sure you have everything you need in the event of severe weather.

weather
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Control the weather

Weather art exhibit

Whether you love or hate Oklahoma City’s ever-changing weather conditions, a new interactive art exhibit at the Arts District Garage will allow you to show Mother Nature who’s boss by controlling the weather. The installation, called “Small Talk About the Weather,” consists of nine bands that swirl along the length of the pedestrian corridor of the garage. LED lights illuminate the bands and display synchronized patterns; an artistic representation of Oklahoma City’s weather.

Visitors can also activate the color and movement by moving in front of the sensor window.  A small ledge allows visitors to place their mobile device and “translate” movement from a video or other active display on their small screen into a pattern of lights and movement on the bands. Visit the display at the pedestrian corridor on the first floor of the Arts District Garage at 431 W Main St.

arts and culture, weather
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Stay weather aware this spring

Skydance Bridge

Spring in Oklahoma City brings a lot of activities that we look forward to each year – the blooms at Myriad Gardens, patio season at our favorite restaurants, the start of the OKC Dodgers season – but it also brings with it an increased likelihood of severe weather. Since OKC recently changed its tornado siren policy, it is important for both long-time residents and OKC newbies to review the changes.

Oklahoma City’s new tornado siren policy makes it more important than ever to immediately take shelter and get more information when you hear a siren. In previous years, OKC sounded all of its sirens within a county affected by a National Weather Service (NWS) tornado warning. For example, if the NWS issued a tornado warning in Cleveland County, Oklahoma City sounded all of its Cleveland County sirens. As a result, people could hear sirens far away from tornado threats.

The important new policy change divides OKC into zones. When the NWS issues a tornado warning, only the sirens in zones covered by the warning will sound. Residents and visitors don’t need to know what zone they’re in, only to immediately take shelter and get more information if they hear a siren. Oklahoma City will continue to test its sirens every Saturday at noon unless there is a threat of severe weather.

Emergency management officials recommend you have more than one way to get warnings and other information about storms. Information sources include NOAA weather radios, smartphone apps, television news, traditional radios and online news and weather websites.

People with disabilities can receive alerts and warnings from the city’s Accessible Hazard Alert System (AHAS). Go to okc.ahasalerts.com to learn more.

weather
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



A guide to watches and warnings

weather center in the fall

If you aren’t familiar with the categories for severe weather, watching a meteorology report can be a little confusing. Here is a no-frills guide to severe weather reporting.

Severe thunderstorm watch
What it means:
The potential exists for the development of thunderstorms that might produce large hail and/or damaging winds.
What to do: Go about your normal activities, but be aware of the weather. Listen to the National Weather Service’s weather radio or local stations for further weather updates.

Severe thunderstorm warning
What it means:
A severe thunderstorm – meaning a storm with large hail and/or damaging winds – is occurring or is imminent.
What to do: Move indoors or to a place of safety.

Tornado watch
What it means:
Conditions are favorable for severe thunderstorms to form, and these storms may be capable of producing a tornado.
What to do: Go about your normal activities, but be aware of the weather. Listen to the National Weather Service’s weather radio or local stations for further weather updates.  

PDS tornado watch
What it means:
This type of tornado watch is issued when the National Weather Service deems a storm to be a “particularly dangerous situation” with the potential for multiple strong or violent tornadoes. Of the tornado watches issued across the U.S. from 1996-2005, only 7 percent were classified as PDS tornado watches.
What to do: Go about your normal activities, but be aware of the weather. Listen to the National Weather Service’s weather radio or local stations for further weather updates.  

Tornado warning
What it means:
A tornado has been spotted or intense low-level rotation has been indicated on weather radar.
What to do: According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), you should take cover immediately in an enclosed, windowless area on the lowest level of your home or office.

It is a good idea to have a severe weather plan in place before potentially dangerous storms hit. The National Weather Service in Norman has put together a handy-dandy guide to make sure you have everything you need in the event of severe weather.

weather
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Spring into Action

The old saying “Don’t like the weather? Wait a day…” is definitely true for Oklahoma, especially this time of year. Most of the time, the weather couldn’t be nicer. In fact, we see 350 sunny days a year in Oklahoma City with an average temp of 61 degrees (Fahrenheit, of course – 61 degrees Celsius would be a tad uncomfortable).

Even though Oklahoma’s weather can be over sensationalized, it never hurts to be weather aware. Luckily for Oklahomans, the National Weather Center is located in Norman, just south of Oklahoma City. The center is home to the most technologically advanced weather equipment in the world and does an amazing job of monitoring not only the weather in central Oklahoma but of the world.

Head over to the climate section of our site for some more helpful info and weather related info.

climate, weather
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Help those in need keep warm

As we launch into full winter mode here in OKC, there are plenty of people who will need coats and other gear to keep warm. Here are some ways to help:

  • The Oklahoma City Public Schools (OKCPS) district already has distributed more than 5,000 new coats to children in need through a partnership with the national nonprofit organization Operation Warm. The organization accepts monetary donations, and then OKCPS buys the new coats to distribute to students in need this winter. Although OKCPS is wrapping up the campaign for funds that began this summer, it is still accepting donations to help and still identifying students’ needs. To donate, send a check or money order with the words “OKCPS Coat-A-Kid project” in the memo to Operation Warm, P.O. Box 822431, Philadelphia, PA 19182-2431 or donate online.
  • For more than 30 years, those in need have been able to “shop” for Christmas gifts and other supplies and clothing in a department store setting where all the merchandise is free. Although it started out as a seasonal nonprofit organization, The Christmas Connection has developed into a service agency that provides support throughout the year through five programs: Christmas Shopping Days, School Connections, Crisis Relief, Senior Shopping Days and General Shopping for basic needs. It only takes $20 to give a child a winter coat. Donate funds online, or donate items by dropping them off at Christmas Connection, Inc., 5728 S May Ave., or at one of four Quik Print locations, 3403 Northwest Expressway, 7206 N Western Ave., 406 NW 23 or 10633 N May Ave.
  •  Infant Crisis Services, Inc., is in need of coats for its littlest clients.
  • Give to Brad Edwards’ Warmth 4 Winter coat drive, which goes to the Salvation Army Central Oklahoma Area Command for distribution. Among other locations in central Oklahoma, you can drop off items in Oklahoma City at KFOR-TV NewsChannel 4, 444 E Britton Road; The Salvation Army – Oklahoma City, 1001 N Pennsylvania;  Earlywine Park YMCA, 11801 S May; and The Outlet Shoppes at Oklahoma City, 7624 W Reno Ave. , #380.  Also, participating Jersey Mike’s restaurants are giving away Philly Cheese subs to those bringing in a new coat for donation through Dec. 21. Find more information on the Warmth 4 Winter website.
community, nonprofit, volunteer, weather
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Donít Like the Weather? Wait a Day.

Much is made of the Oklahoma climate, and while we are prone to somewhat sudden changes in temperature the weather is actually pretty pleasant year-round. It is getting a little colder outside, but the average high temperature, in November is actually 62 degrees. In December, the average drops to a brisk 51 degrees, just enough chill to break out the hot chocolate and blankets.

Even though Oklahoma’s weather is often sensationalized, it never hurts to be weather aware. Luckily for Oklahomans, the National Weather Center is located in Norman, just south of Oklahoma City. The center is home to the most technologically advanced weather equipment in the world and does an amazing job of monitoring not only the weather in central Oklahoma but of the world. Are you the type that likes to plan ahead? The City of Oklahoma City offers winter weather resources, like snow routes and preparation tips.

weather
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (1)



Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Raindrops Keep Falling on Your Head?

We’ve mentioned before that here in OKC, we have the benefit of experiencing all four seasons. Who doesn’t love that? It means we get to really live it up weather-wise, but come spring-time, it also means that we need to be weather wise.

Oklahoma’s location east of the Rocky Mountains and north of the Gulf of Mexico mean that we are sometimes a hot spot for some interesting weather. Cold dry air from the Rocky Mountains and Canada have the potential to gather over our state with warm, moist air from the Gulf of Mexico, sometimes resulting in thunderstorms or even more severe weather including tornadoes.

Like other states that have the potential for severe weather, here in Oklahoma, we are pretty well prepared for what Mother Nature might throw our way. Nearly 200 tornado sirens are operated across Greater Oklahoma City. These sirens are utilized when a tornado warning exists in our area. What’s a tornado warning? Here, our meteorologists issue watches and warnings (both for severe thunderstorms and tornadoes). Here’s a brief overview from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

And to help you get prepared for any storms that might come our way, the City of Oklahoma City has assembled a number of references and resources on their site to help. Included in this powerhouse of preparedness are tips for building an emergency supply kit. So go on, download your favorite TV station’s weather app, make sure your weather radio has new batteries and be like a Boy Scout because who doesn’t like being prepared?

climate, community, weather
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)