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Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Interview with Ward 7ís Niki Nice

Nikki Nice

The story original ran on VeloCityOKC.com.

Nikki Nice is a first-term City Councilor representing Ward 7 in OKC after winning a runoff election last November. She recently took the time to sit down with VeloCityOKC and tell us about her background, which led to on-air radio jobs at Perry Publishing & Broadcasting’s KRMP & KVSP in OKC as well as other markets, why she ran for city council, her thoughts on some of Ward 7’s assets (including her favorite spots to eat) and challenges, and Oklahoma City in general.

VeloCityOKC: Tell us a little bit about yourself.

Councilwoman Nice: I was born and raised here. I grew up in Capitol View, attended Millwood Public Schools, and my church was literally across the street, Greater New Zion Baptist Church. From there, I went to Northeast High School to be a part of the biomedical sciences program there. I didn't want to go to Northeast, but my mom made me go to be a part of the bio-med program, but when I got there, I had 10 of my Millwood friends there with me. Their parents obviously thought it was best for them to be a part of the bio-med program too, so that pretty much made my high school transition much easier, to have some of those friends.

There I [also] did Newsroom 101, yearbook, journalism. I didn't play sports, but I was the basketball manager. I had a few favorite teachers, but one was Ms. Karen Parks [now Patton]. She was our English, yearbook, and journalism teacher. I was also afforded the opportunity to be taught by Ms. Nancy Davis, Jr. -- her mom [Nancy Randolph Davis] was the first African-American student to attend Oklahoma State University, so we got a lot of great history from Ms. Davis.

I was also part of YLX, and I did student council, so [in terms of] civic engagement, community, and leadership, those things shaped me. Even at Millwood, being a part of Brownies, and Girl Scouts, and things like that. Just being active in my church; my mom made sure I was very active in church, reading the church announcements and things like that, ushering with her.

And you are a Langston grad; what did study during college?

I started my college career at the University of Central Oklahoma... My major had always been journalism & broadcasting. I wanted to be a sportscaster, because I love sports. My favorite baseball team is the Cincinnati Reds--I'm so excited now that Matt Kemp is now a Red. And obviously the Thunder, because I was also originally a SuperSonics fan. And I am a [Dallas] Cowboys fan, because my mom was a Cowboys fan, so we would watch football on Sundays, and she pretty much taught me football, and she would scream at the TV at Tony Dorsett and all the football players.

What got me into radio was my church. We had a church broadcast on Saturdays at 1220 AM. After I did that, I was like, “I think I like this. People don't have to see me.”

Read the full interview with Councilwoman Nice at VelocityOKC.com.

election, government, Oklahoma City
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Make your voice heard

Vote in OKC

If all this talk of Oklahoma City’s growth and potential has you bursting with civic pride, we have the perfect outlet for you. Today, Oklahoma City residents in Wards 2, 5, 6 and 8 will have the chance to choose who will serve on the City Council for the next four-year term, which begins in April 2019. A total of 12 candidates filed to run for Oklahoma City Council, including incumbents David Greenwell (Ward 5) and Mark Stonecipher (Ward 8). Other candidates are James Cooper, Mike Dover, Suzanne Broadbent, Tracey Halley Terrell and Marilyn Davidson for Ward 2; Kristina Hull for Ward 5; Nathaniel Harding, JoBeth Hamon and Jim Holman for Ward 6; and Lauren Durmas for Ward 8.

If you are feeling overwhelmed, never fear! The Chamber recently surveyed each candidate on issues that are important to Oklahoma City’s growth. See their responses at VeloCityOKC.com.

Other municipalities throughout the metro area also have candidates standing for city and school board elections. View all elections for Oklahoma, Canadian and Cleveland counties, and make sure you take the time to vote today!

community, election
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Register to vote this week

vote

Whether you have lived in Oklahoma City your whole life or just moved here, being active in local government and voting is one of the most important things you can do. With a handful of Oklahoma City Council elections coming on Feb. 12, now is a great time to register.

The deadline to register to vote in the next election is Jan. 18. To get your voter registration form visit the election board website. At the site, you can also find your polling location, request an absentee ballot and view a sample ballot.

The upcoming election will decide who will serve the citizens of Wards 2, 5, 6 and 8. You can find a Ward map here if you aren’t sure what Ward you live in.

Also it is important to remember that even though your mailing address might be in Yukon, Edmond or another community, you may still actually live in Oklahoma City and are eligible to register. If you pay your trash bill to the City of Oklahoma City odds are you can vote.

election, government
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Your vote wanted

Vote Buttons

One of the most important things you can do to become a full-fledged citizen of your new hometown is vote. Nov. 6 is an important election day across the country and things are no different in the metro, where the ballot will be full of elections at every level of government.

You can find your polling place and request an absentee ballot at the Oklahoma State Election Board’s online voter tool.

The ballot will also include a special election to elect Oklahoma City’s next Ward 7 representative. Nikki Nice and Kirk Pankratz earned the most votes in the primary special election and will stand for a decisive runoff election on Nov. 6.

View what will appear on the ballot in Oklahoma, Canadian and Cleveland counties, and make sure you are prepared to cast an informed vote on Nov. 6.

community, election, government
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Get out the vote

Vote Buttons

Hopefully we don’t have to tell you how important it is to exercise your right to vote and, luckily, you will have the opportunity to do so on Tuesday, June 26. In addition to the primary elections for several statewide and local offices, Oklahoma residents will also be able to vote on one state question.

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at your polling precinct on Tuesday, June 26. You can request an absentee ballot or participate in early voting on Thursday, June 21 (8 a.m. to 6 p.m.); Friday, June 22 (8 a.m. to 6 p.m.) and Saturday, June 23 (9 a.m. to 2 p.m.) at your county election board. The Oklahoma Election Board online voter tool can help you confirm your voter registration, find your polling place and view a sample ballot. Independent voters also have a chance to make their voice heard; in Oklahoma, the Democratic Party allows you to vote in its primary and runoff elections.

community, election
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Rock the vote

Vote February 13

Voting has been the backbone of Oklahoma City’s modern renaissance. From MAPS to bond packages, citizens showing up at the ballot box have transformed our city. Beyond big infrastructure projects, our citizens have also elected leaders who have not let the metro rest on past successes. Oklahoma City has a history of electing leaders with a vision for the future.

Today, you can do your part to help to make sure that tradition continues by voting for Oklahoma City Mayor and Oklahoma City Public School’s District 5 seat. Polls are open until 7 p.m. this evening.

Use the Oklahoma State Election Board's online voter tool to confirm your registration, find your polling place and view sample ballots. Many residents with non-OKC addresses or ZIP codes actually live in Oklahoma City and can vote in the mayoral primary. See if you are eligible to vote in Oklahoma City elections

community, education, election, government, Oklahoma City
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Register to vote

Vote February 13

On Feb. 13 citizens of Oklahoma City will have the chance to vote for Oklahoma City mayor and three seats on the Oklahoma City Public Schools Board of Education. If you are not registered to vote in Oklahoma City don’t fret because you still have time. The deadline to register is this Friday.

If you aren’t eligible to vote ask yourself three simple questions:

  • Am I 18 years old?
  • Am I a U.S. citizen?
  • Am I a resident of Oklahoma City?

If you answered yes to all three questions chances are you can register.

Also it is important to remember that even though your mailing address might be in Yukon, Edmond or another community, you may still actually live in Oklahoma City and are eligible to register. If you pay your trash bill to the City of Oklahoma City odds are you can vote.

To get your voter registration form visit the election board website. To read up on all the candidates be sure to read our election guide here.

community, election, government
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



OKCivics 101

OKC Government

While we are on the subject of voting we feel like an informed voter is a good voter. If you are new to Oklahoma City why not start with a brief civics lesson on the basics of our local government?

Check out more about how Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County and the state governments are structured on the site’s Government Page. The Chamber’s www.greateroklahomacity.com has a list of local municipalities surrounding the Oklahoma City area.

You can also go directly to these institutions’ home pages:

community, election, government
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Safer Streets, Better OKC

Vote September 12

On Sept. 12, citizens of Oklahoma City will go to the polls to decide on a bond program and two sales tax proposals.  There is going to be a lot on the ballot, so we will just give you the highlights (you can read the full ballot here):

  • REPAIR AND RESURFACE STREETS: Invest $847 million in rebuilding and improving Oklahoma City's streets--the top concern of residents. Repairs include replacing bridges, resurfacing streets, building sidewalks, improving drainage, adding bike lanes and more.
  • IMPROVE PUBLIC SAFETY: Hire more police officers and firefighters to keep Oklahoma City residents safe.
  • IMPROVE QUALITY OF LIFE: Improve our Oklahoma City by investing in parks and civic / recreational facilities, police and fire stations, libraries, our public transit system, community and economic development programs, and more.

Oklahoma City has created a great tool that allows you to see what bond projects would happen in your area if approved.

What will this do to taxes in OKC? Property tax rates will NOT go up to fund the general obligation bond projects, and if both sales tax proposals are approved by voters, Oklahoma City’s total sales tax will be at the rate of 8.625 percent, still lower than the state average of 8.86 percent.

So what do you need to do between now and Sept. 12? First and foremost register to vote. You have until August 18 to register for this election. Also, make sure you read up on the proposal so you can be informed on the vote you cast. You can learn more here.

community, election, government
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Voting Info

Voting Booths

With the Fourth of July coming up and a special election quickly approaching, what better way to flex your patriotic muscles than to register to vote? Here are some quick tips to help get you there.

  • If you’d like to register to vote, fill out the Voter Registration Application Form and follow the instructions. Once registered, you’ll get a voter ID card.
  • To find out when annual and special elections are being held and if they’re in your district, check out the 2017 election calendar on the Oklahoma State Election Board website.

Once you’ve registered and found out when elections are taking place in your House and Senate districts, you’re all set to start exercising your right to vote in Oklahoma. Now get out there, start voting and have a happy Fourth of July!

election
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Moving made easy: voting

voting booths

You probably haven’t heard but there is a small election taking place later this year. If you are new to our city (and maybe even if you aren’t) you might be wondering how to register to vote. Don’t worry, here is just about everything you need to know.

  • First, you have to register. You can do this by downloading a form online and mailing it in or by going to your county’s election board office, a tag agency, a post office, a public library or another designated public location.
  • Once you’ve registered, you’ll get a voter ID card. You’ll need to show your voter ID card or current driver’s license when you go to your precinct to vote. If you’ve already registered and are in the Oklahoma State Election Board system, find your precinct using your name and birth date here. Or get additional help here.
  • And then you vote. Statewide, polls are open at individual precincts from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on election days. Find your precinct. But you can vote early -- Request an absentee ballot in writing or through your individual county’s election board, or go in person to your county election board and participate in early voting, usually from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on the Thursday and Friday before the election. Check the election calendar for specifics. In Oklahoma County, the address is 4201 N Lincoln Blvd.

The Oklahoma State Election Board’s website is a good resource.

Note that even if you have a mailing address from one of our suburbs, you still might be eligible to vote in Oklahoma City – if you pay utilities to the City of OKC. Also, here are the numbers to surrounding-area local election boards (with their county seats in parentheses) if you still have questions:

government, community, election
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, September 1, 2015

How to vote

voting booths

With the 2016 presidential campaign heating up, it’s time to start thinking about voting in the presidential election – or in any of the other upcoming elections between now and then, including a special election on Sept. 8. On that date, those who live in State House District 85 will vote for state representative between Chip Carter and Cyndi Munson.

Here’s a quick primer on voting in Oklahoma:

  • First, you have to register. You can do this by downloading a form online and mailing it in or by going to your county’s election board office, a tag agency, a post office, a public library or another designated public location. After Nov. 1, voters will be able to submit the form online, thanks to a new state law. For the Nov. 10 general election, registration deadline is Oct. 16. Find out additional registration deadlines on this election calendar.
  • Once you’ve registered, you’ll get a voter ID card that you’ll need to show when you go to your precinct to vote. If you’ve already registered and are in the Oklahoma State Election Board system, find your precinct using your name and birth date here. Or get additional help here.
  • And then you vote. Statewide, polls are open at individual precincts from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on election days. Find your precinct. But you can vote early -- Request an absentee ballot in writing or through your individual county’s election board, or go in person to your county election board and participate in early voting, usually from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on the Thursday and Friday before the election. Check the election calendar for specifics. In Oklahoma County, the address is 4201 N Lincoln Blvd.

The Oklahoma State Election Board’s website is a good resource.

Note that even if you have a mailing address from one of our suburbs, you still might be eligible to vote in Oklahoma City – if you pay utilities to the City of OKC. Also, here are the numbers to surrounding-area local election boards (with their county seats in parentheses) if you still have questions:

election, government
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



The root of Oklahoma Cityís forward momentum

Kayakers on the Oklahoma River

While we’re on the subject of elections, let’s talk about one of the most important elections in Oklahoma City’s recent history – the one that changed everything and led to the city’s current, ongoing transformation. If you have visited the Oklahoma River or seen the U.S. Olympic training programs for both canoe/kayak and rowing programs there or attended an OKC Dodgers game in Bricktown, you’ve enjoyed some of the results of that election more than 20 years ago.

Informally and most commonly known as MAPS, the first election for Metropolitan Area Projects happened on Dec. 14, 1993. Then, voters approved a five-year, one-cent sales tax to build or upgrade nine community facilities – projects that are now known as the Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark (construction), Cox Convention Center (renovation), State Fair Park (improvements), the Bricktown Canal (construction), Ronald J. Norick Downtown Library (construction), Chesapeake Energy Arena (construction), the Oklahoma River (transformation into a popular recreation area with rowing, kayaking and more), Civic Center Music Hall (rebuilding) and new trolleys.

The initiative was so successful and popular that voters have since approved similar limited-term MAPS sales taxes three more times. MAPS for Kids funded school improvements and renovations and MAPS 3, which passed in 2009 is currently underway.

All projects have been built debt free, and each sales tax has had a term limit.

Since MAPS passed in 1993, Oklahoma City has seen more than $5 billion in new public and private investment throughout the city. But the energy, momentum and pride these projects have added to our city are unmeasurable.

Bricktown, Dodgers, election, library, MAPS, Oklahoma River, school
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (1)



How to find and contact your elected officials

Business Advocacy Center

If you don’t know who your elected officials are, the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber offers a handy tool to find them online at its Business Advocacy Center.

Just type in your ZIP code or address in the box on the right-hand side of the page, hit enter, and you’ll see all of them connected to your geographic location, from President Obama on down to state senators and representatives. The corresponding list offers direct links to the office holders’ web pages.

On this page, you can also sign up to join our email list that will update you about the Chamber’s advocacy efforts, especially during Oklahoma’s legislative session, offering updates and more.

And if you want to find out about who has filed for office, who is running and more, go online to the Oklahoma State Election Board. Here’s a comprehensive list, in PDF form.

election, government
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Calling all future politicians

Have you always aspired to one day find yourself sitting in the Oval Office? Maybe your democratic dreams are of helping your city or state through your service. Either way, we have a must-attend event for all those who dream of taking a political path – Practical Politics coming up on Tuesday, Oct. 8 at the OKC Zoo. Every other year, the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber tracks down some of our region’s political experts and gathers them in a room to help folks like you learn the ropes of running a successful campaign.

This year’s keynote speaker is former Oklahoma governor George Nigh who served our great state from 1979 through 1987. Other topics and their speakers include:

  • How to Effectively Raise Campaign Funds - Rep. Scott Inman, Democratic House Minority Leader
  • Running a Successful Campaign: Wining Local, Statewide & Congressional Elections - Pat McFerron, CMA Strategies
  • How to Comply with State Election and Ethics Laws - Lee Slater, Executive Director, Oklahoma Ethics Commission
  • How to Be a Good Candidate and Elected Official - Nick Massey, Edmond City Councilman, and Laura Massenat, Oklahoma City Public Schools Board Member

The cost to attend this event is $35 for members of the Chamber and $45 for non-members. If you’re a college student with valid student ID, the event is free! What a steal!

election, government
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)