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Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Here’s what you missed on VeloCity in November

OKC Skyline

VeloCity is a website aimed at helping keep residents of Greater Oklahoma City up to date on important issues. Whether you have lived in the metro for 30 years or 30 minutes it is important that you are informed and engaged with your community. If you haven’t checked out the new site, here are some stories you may have missed last month:

  • OKC gets top honors: Oklahoma City was recently honored as “America’s Most Livable Community”.
  • Aerospace is still soaring: A panel of experts recently gave their thoughts on the future of aerospace in our region.
  • Sur La Table opens: The popular kitchenware retailer recently opened their first Oklahoma location in Classen Curve.
  • CEO Q&A: SYNQ3 CEO Steve Bigari sat down with the website to talk about his decision to expand his company to Oklahoma City.
aerospace, business, community, retail, velocity
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Reaching for the sky

Airplane

Oklahoma City and aerospace go hand-in-hand, but if you are new to OKC you might not fully appreciate how important the industry is to our current economy.

Most people will recognize the major players in Oklahoma City’s aerospace industry, like the Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center at Tinker Air Force Base and its partnerships with private companies such as Boeing, Lockheed Martin and Pratt & Whitney to operate the largest aircraft and jet repair center in the U.S. Another star performer is the FAA’s Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center, whose 5,500 employees provide aviation training and logistics support to the nation’s aerospace system. And Oklahoma City’s educational institutions in the region have close and frequent interaction with these industry professionals, laying the foundation for further growth.

Most recently Kratos Defense announced they will be building a new facility in Oklahoma City that will build jet-powered unmanned aircraft. The new 75,000-square-foot facility will employee more than 350 workers.

All of these factors combine to make aerospace one of the key drivers of our region’s economy. It supports more than 85,000 workers and the production of $7.3 billion in goods and services in Oklahoma City alone. On a state level, aviation is Oklahoma’s top foreign export and accounts for a staggering 10 percent of our state’s economy. Oklahoma is one of the top 10 states nationally in traditional aerospace employment.

aerospace, business, jobs, Tinker
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Aviation giant

Our love of aerospace and aviation isn’t really a new phenomenon – it’s as big a part of our Oklahoma DNA as football or the land run.  While Oklahoma has had many famous pilots they all trace back to Oklahoma native Wiley Post. Post became an international superstar when he made the first solo flight around the world in 1933. Post also developed the first pressure suit,  allowing him to fly his famous plane, the Winnie Mae, into the stratosphere.

What some people don’t know about Post is the he didn’t begin his aviation career as a pilot. He actually started out as a parachutist in a flying circus! An oilfield injury that caused him to lose his left eye, but gave him a rad eye patch, brought an $1,800 settlement that he used to buy his first plane.

To honor the aviation giant, Oklahoma City named an airport in NW Oklahoma City in recognition.

aerospace, aviation, history, Oklahoma City history
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, July 18, 2017

I Believe I Can Fly… Nonstop to 20 cities!

Plane taking off

Being right in the middle of the country has its perks. For one, it doesn’t take too long to get practically anywhere in the U.S., especially if you fly (on an airplane, not like Superman). From Chicago to Dallas, San Francisco to New York, Will Rogers World Airport has flight options to 23 airports in 20 different cities across the country, and just today Frontier Airlines announced a return to the OKC market with flights to Denver, Orlando and San Diego. That means no changing planes, no pesky layovers and no switching seats.

You’d also be interested to find out that OKC doesn’t have just one airport, but three. The second one, Wiley Post Airport, is a reliever airport for Will Rogers and functions as a major center for corporate and business aviation. The third, Clarence E. Page airport, is a facility perfect for grass-roots aviators with a number of experimental and small general aviation aircraft.

So, whether you’re a business person with a turbulent flight schedule, someone who just loves to travel or a person who really can fly solo like Superman but just doesn’t want to because you have three bags of luggage (trust me, it’s tough without the super strength), OKC has plenty of airports and options to get you where you’re going.

aerospace
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Take flight in OKC

Tinker

If you are new to OKC, you might not fully appreciate how important the aerospace industry is to our current economy.

Most people will recognize the major players in Oklahoma City’s aerospace industry, like the Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center at Tinker Air Force Base and its partnerships with private companies such as Boeing, Lockheed Martin and Pratt & Whitney to operate the largest aircraft and jet engine repair center in the U.S. Another star performer is the FAA’s Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center, whose 5,500 employees provide aviation training and logistics support to the nation’s aerospace system. And Oklahoma City’s educational institutions in the region have close and frequent interaction with these industry professionals, laying the foundation for further growth.

Will Rogers World Airport is another hub of Greater Oklahoma City's aviation industry is with approximately 10,000 employees and 67 tenants. More than 3.7 million travels pass through our airport every year. Most recently, the airport announced three new restaurants coming to the airport including local favorites Tucker’s Onion Burgers and Coolgreens.

All of these factors combine to make aerospace one of the key drivers of our region’s economy. It supports more than 85,000 workers and the production of $7.3 billion in goods and services in Oklahoma City alone.

aerospace, aviation, restaurants, Tinker
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, September 20, 2016

There is more than meets the eye in the OKC economy

OKC Skyline

While energy jobs are the first thing that pops into most people’s mind when talking about the Oklahoma City economy, most new residents (and even some longtime residents) are surprised to find out how big industries like aerospace, biotech and technology are in the metro. Ever wonder why Oklahoma City ranks so high as a place for job seekers? The growth and stability of these industries are definite contributors to our success.

Aerospace
With recent announcements of job growth from Boeing and Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma City’s aerospace industry is soaring, pun intended. Greater Oklahoma City’s aerospace industry represents more than 36,000 jobs at more than 230 public- and private-sector firms. The state of Oklahoma ranks 12th nationally in the number of aerospace engineers, fifth in aircraft mechanics and service technicians, and eighth in avionic technicians. Aerospace firms now produce $4.9 billion in goods and services locally, up from $4.3 billion as of 2011.

Biotechnology
With the Oklahoma Health Center just north of downtown, Oklahoma City has long been a hub of biotech research. In recent years, Oklahoma City’s own research institutions have made significant advances in the fields of Alzheimer’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and septicemia, to name a few. Firms in Greater Oklahoma City’s biotech sector boast annual revenues of more than $6.7 billion and employ more than 51,000 workers.

Technology and entrepreneurship
It is no secret that Oklahoma City’s pioneers, both in the past and present, have carried a spirit of entrepreneurship into their business and civic ventures. That spirit is very much alive today in Oklahoma City’s growing entrepreneurship community. From successful tech startups to the inventor’s workbench, OKC is a place where your ideas can get off the ground. (Looking for entrepreneurial resources? Visit www.greateroklahomacity.com [especially the EDIS and LBI tools] and www.i2e.org.). For more on the entrepreneur scene in Oklahoma City check out http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/35fc33e7#/35fc33e7/1.

Energy
Oklahoma City has long been considered a global oil capital, and with good reason. Oklahoma has a rich history of growing successful energy companies, and our state Capitol even has a working oil rig on its grounds. But a lot has changed since the early wildcatter days of Oklahoma’s past. Oklahoma energy companies work in petroleum, compressed natural gas, wind power and solar energy, and they use state-of-the-art technology. In fact, GE Research’s first industry-specific research center recently opened in Oklahoma City and will bring the most updated oil and gas technology to Oklahoma City’s energy companies. 

tech, aerospace, bioscience, employment, energy, entrepreneur, jobs
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Take flight in OKC

Tinker Planes

Oklahoma City and aerospace go hand-in-hand, but if you are new to OKC you might not fully appreciate how important the industry is to our current economy.

Most people will recognize the major players in Oklahoma City’s aerospace industry, like the Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center at Tinker Air Force Base and its partnerships with private companies such as Boeing, Lockheed Martin and Pratt & Whitney to operate the largest aircraft and jet repair center in the U.S. Another star performer is the FAA’s Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center, whose 5,500 employees provide aviation training and logistics support to the nation’s aerospace system. And Oklahoma City’s educational institutions in the region have close and frequent interaction with these industry professionals, laying the foundation for further growth.

Will Rogers World Airport is another hub of Greater Oklahoma City's aviation industry is with approximately 10,000 employees and 67 tenants. A recent $10 million renovation nearly doubled the size of the terminal, as well as expanded and updated amenities to make traveling more enjoyable for the 3.7 million passengers it serves every year.

All of these factors combine to make aerospace one of the key drivers of our region’s economy. It supports more than 85,000 workers and the production of $7.3 billion in goods and services in Oklahoma City alone. On a state level, aviation is Oklahoma’s top foreign export and accounts for a staggering 10 percent of our state’s economy. Oklahoma is one of the top 10 states nationally in traditional aerospace employment.

aerospace
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Making a mark on aviation history

While the Wright brothers may not have hailed from Oklahoma, plenty of other aviation pioneers did, allowing Oklahoma to leave an indelible mark on the industry’s history. Aviation pioneers Clyde Cessna, Will Rogers, Shannon Lucid, Wiley Post, and John “Lee” Atwood all contributed to the craft of aviation while living in Oklahoma, with Will Rogers and Wiley Post both calling Oklahoma “home” for the majority of their lives.

Post first made headlines in 1931 when he and his navigator broke the record by flying around the world in just eight days (hey, it was 1931). This accomplishment made Post a national celebrity (on par with Charles Lindbergh). In 1933, he became the first person to fly solo around the world. For most people, that would be enough accomplishment for a lifetime, but not for Mr. Post. He also developed one of the first pressure suits and discovered the jet stream (all while wearing an amazing eye patch).

Another Oklahoma aviation and military pioneer is Major Gen. Clarence Tinker, who was born in Osage Nation near Pawhuska, Okla., in 1887. He began his distinguished military service in 1912, when he was commissioned into the U.S. Army as a second lieutenant. During World War I, he rose in rank to major, and in 1919 he was transferred to the place where he would spend the bulk of his career, the Air Corps.

After rising through the ranks, he was named Commander of the Seventh Air Force in Hawaii after the attacks on Pearl Harbor. In 1942, Tinker was promoted to major general, becoming the first Native American to reach that rank and the highest-ranking officer with Native American ancestry in the U.S. Army at that time. Tinker demonstrated the hands-on, get-things-done nature of Oklahomans when he personally led a force of B-24s against the retreating Japanese naval forces during the Battle of Midway on June 7.

During that battle, Tinker became the first American general killed during World War II, but his legacy was commemorated in a lasting way a few months later when the Oklahoma City Air Depot was named Tinker Field in his honor. That air depot served its country faithfully during World War II and is still serving faithfully today as Tinker Air Force Base and the Air Force Sustainment Center.

aviation, history, aerospace
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)



Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Variety is the spice of OKC’s economy

Tinker Air Force Base

Oklahoma City has a robust job market with several strong industries, all of which contribute to the area’s low unemployment rate. Ever wonder why Oklahoma City ranks so high as a place for job seekers? The growth and stability of these industries are definite contributors to our success.

Aerospace
With recent announcements of job growth from Boeing and Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma City’s aerospace industry is soaring, pun intended. Greater Oklahoma City’s aerospace industry represents more than 38,000 jobs at more than 300 public- and private-sector firms. The state of Oklahoma ranks 12th nationally in the number of aerospace engineers, fifth in aircraft mechanics and service technicians, and eighth in avionic technicians.

Biotechnology
With the Oklahoma Health Center just north of downtown, Oklahoma City has long been a hub of biotech research. In recent years, Oklahoma City’s own research institutions have made significant advances in the fields of Alzheimer’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and septicemia, to name a few. Firms in Greater Oklahoma City’s biotech sector boast annual revenues of more than $4.1 billion and employ more than 27,800 workers.

Energy
Oklahoma City has long been considered a global oil capital, and with good reason. Oklahoma has a rich history of growing successful energy companies, and our state Capitol even has a working oil rig on its grounds. But a lot has changed since the early wildcatter days of Oklahoma’s past. Oklahoma energy companies work in petroleum, compressed natural gas, wind power and solar energy, and they use state-of-the-art technology. In fact, GE Research’s first industry-specific research center is being constructed in Oklahoma City and will bring the most updated oil and gas technology to Oklahoma City’s energy companies.  

Technology and entrepreneurship
It is no secret that Oklahoma City’s pioneers, both in the past and present, have carried a spirit of entrepreneurship into their business and civic ventures. That spirit is very much alive today in Oklahoma City’s growing entrepreneurship community. From successful tech startups to the inventor’s workbench, OKC is a place where your ideas can get off the ground. (Looking for entrepreneurial resources? Visit www.growinokc.com, www.greateroklahomacity.com [especially the EDIS and LBI tools] and www.i2e.org.). For more on the entrepreneur scene in Oklahoma City check out www.velocityokc.com.

aerospace, bioscience, energy, entrepreneur, jobs, tech
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)