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Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Guthrie’s Historic District is called one of the best neighborhoods in America.

Historic Downtown Guthrie

This story originally ran on VeloCityokc.com.

Anyone who’s taken a stroll through Guthrie’s Historic District will vouch: It’s one of the most gorgeous neighborhoods in the nation and easily one of the most underrated attractions in Oklahoma in its entirety. Well, we actually won’t be able to say “underrated” for much longer: Guthrie’s Historic District was recently rated by the American Planning Association (APA) to be one of the five best neighborhoods in the entire country. With the Canalway Cultural District in Lowell, MA; the Village of Shelburne Falls in Shelburne and Buckland, MA; Historic Downtown Georgetown in Georgetown, TX; and Ghent in Norfolk, VA as its list mates, Guthrie’s Historic District finds itself in good (and prestigious) company.

“APA’s Great Places in America recognizes unique and exemplary streets, neighborhoods, and public spaces — three essential components of all communities. These authentic places have been shaped by forward thinking planning that showcases affordable transportation options, promotes community involvement and accessibility, and fosters economic opportunity.”

You can read an article about this and view the APA’s best public spaces and streets on NextCity.

accolade, attractions, day-trip, Guthrie, history, Visit OKC
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Up North

If you want to take a road trip north of Oklahoma City you can find history, sports, outdoor fun and more. 

First, let’s start with the history because there is no better way to celebrate Oklahoma’s rich history than to visit the largest Historic Preservation District in the nation. Guthrie is Oklahoma’s territorial capital and home to historic museums, more than a dozen bed and breakfasts and a highly preserved historical downtown district.

After Guthrie, we suggest you keep your caravan moving north to Stillwater, one of Oklahoma’s most famous college towns. Home to the Oklahoma State University Cowboys, Stillwater is sure to show you a good time. Stillwater is home to the National Wrestling Hall of Fame, one of the best public golf courses in America, Karsten Creek, three different lakes and a downtown that looks like it belongs on a postcard.

OKC’s closest neighbor to the north is Edmond. Edmond is home to two colleges, lakes, parks and more. We suggest checking the schedule of the Armstrong Auditorium to experience this architectural gem. You can read more about Edmond in a past post here.

arts and culture, college, day-trip, Edmond, golf, Guthrie, history, museums, Stillwater, water sports
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Road Trip North: Guthrie

Guthrie

The city of Guthrie (located just 35 minutes north of Oklahoma City) was chosen as the Territorial Capital in the months following the Land Run of 1889, and when Oklahoma gained statehood in 1907, Guthrie became the state capital. Today, Guthrie has retained much of its territorial architecture (and charm!) to become one of the most picturesque places to visit. It stands today as a National Historic Landmark filled with examples of late 19th and early 20th Century architecture.

Here are just a few of the many ways to experience Guthrie:

  • Grab some delicious donuts at Missy’s Donuts & Bakery.
  • Find your inner musician at the Double Stop Fiddle Shop. We hear that Vince Gill has been known to pop in.
  • Catch a show at the Pollard Theater.
  • Get your caffeine fix at Hoboken Coffee Roasters.
  • Going in the summer months? Don’t miss the chance for a good old-fashioned drive-in movie at Beacon Drive-In.
Guthrie
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, April 26, 2016

A hometown adventure

Oklahoma History Center

Today, we know Oklahoma City as a thriving, vibrant city full of fun things to do, great places to shop and world-class restaurants. You might be surprised that our city has a storied history. Born at the sound of a gunshot, Oklahoma City was settled by a historic land run involving 10,000 homesteaders on April 22, 1889. By 1900, the population had more than doubled and on November 16, 1907, Oklahoma became the 46th state.

A fun fact for all you history buffs – Oklahoma City was not always the capitol of Oklahoma; nearby Guthrie takes the distinction of being the first. On June 11, 1910, voters decided to move the capitol from Guthrie to Oklahoma City. In fact, the Secretary of State brought the state seal by order of Gov. Haskell to the Huckins Hotel, making the hotel the State Capitol of Oklahoma. Despite the hotel being demolished in 1971, its colorful history lives on. You can read a full account of the state capitol move here. The current Oklahoma State Capitol was built in 1919 at N.E. 23rd Street and Lincoln Boulevard.

These are just a few of the fun facts that you can discover on a self-guided tour of the Oklahoma History Center. Why not check it out and find out about the state’s history for yourself?

Located just northeast of downtown near the Oklahoma State Capitol, the Oklahoma History Center is a great place to explore. Check out the Smithsonian-quality exhibits and more than 2,000 artifacts which reflect the inspiring and adventurous spirit of our state. More information on museum hours and admission prices is available here.

The Oklahoma Museum of History is a division of the Oklahoma Historical Society, the keeper of the state’s history. That website is filled to the brim with information that could fill out any school history report or satisfy your curiosity about all things history Oklahoma. Explore photographs, news accounts, oral histories, records and more. It’s definitely our go-to resource for all history questions.

While you’re here, don’t miss the Red River Journey -- a walking tour of the Red River Valley.  In addition to land forms, vegetation and important historical locations, the grounds also include an outdoor oilfield exhibit complete with drilling derricks, a portable derrick and machinery associated with Oklahoma oil explorations.

And an extra fun fact – The street where the Oklahoma History Center is located is named after another well-known and respected immigrant, Dr. Nazih Zuhdi, who was born in Beirut, Lebanon, and performed Oklahoma’s first heart transplant and was a pioneer surgeon in many other ways. Read more about him here and here.

Guthrie, history, museums, Oklahoma, Oklahoma City history
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Guthrie

Guthrie at night

The city of Guthrie (located just 35 minutes north of Oklahoma City) was chosen as the territorial capital in the months following the Land Run of 1889, and when Oklahoma gained statehood in 1907, Guthrie became the state capital. Today, Guthrie has retained much of its territorial architecture (and charm!) to become one of the most picturesque places to visit. It stands today as a National Historic Landmark filled with examples of late 19th and early 20th Century architecture.

Here are just a few of the many ways to experience Guthrie:

day-trip, food, Guthrie, history, movies, retail, theater
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Rounding Home

There are two more communities to the north that are well worth a day-trip when you want to explore. We’ve already talked about them previously so be sure to check out some of our past blogs for more in-depth info.

  • Guthrie- The great state of Oklahoma’s first capital (for the full story click here), Guthrie is located just 35 minutes due north of OKC. Downtown Guthrie is a must-visit destination on your check list as it feature many buildings from the late 19th century and is even designated a National Historic Landmark.
  • Stillwater- Head just a little further up I-35 and you’ll hit Stillwater. The town is home to Oklahoma State University so it’s a great chance to catch some college sports. You can also visit the National Wrestling Hall of Fame for more on the history of one of the world’s oldest sports. Downtown Stillwater offers a classic main street and there are three lakes in Stillwater that offer aquatic fun.
water sports, Guthrie, history, museums, Stillwater
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Get on Up to Guthrie

You want to know one of the best things about living in Greater Oklahoma City? It’s more than just Oklahoma City. Sure, we love everything Oklahoma City has to offer, but Greater Oklahoma City is, well, greater. When combined with all of the surrounding cities, there is so much to do and experience it would take a lifetime to do it all. So you better get started.

This week, we’re going to focus on one of OKC’s neighbors to the north – Guthrie. Guthrie just so happened to be Oklahoma’s first state capital (you can read more on that here) and it’s a pretty perfect place to spend a day (or more). So head north (a mere 35 minutes up I-35) and you’ll see what we’re talking about. Guthrie has a website full of suggestions for how to fill your time (and belly) while in Guthrie.

Here are just a few of the many options you will find.

family-friendly, food, Guthrie, movies, restaurants, theater
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Capital Shenanigans

Back before Oklahoma became the 46th star on the United States flag, it was just a territory with dreams of gaining statehood. But even as a territory, it needed a capital city. The city of Guthrie (located just 35 minutes north of Oklahoma City) was chosen as the Territorial Capital in the months following the Land Run of 1889. And when Oklahoma gained statehood in 1907, Guthrie became the state capital.

But you say, “Wait a minute. Oklahoma City is the capital of Oklahoma.” Well, my friend, you are correct. The deal was that Guthrie would remain the capital until 1913 and then the people of Oklahoma would vote and choose a permanent location. It didn’t really go that way, though. Instead, Gov. Charles Haskell called for an early statewide election and on June 11, 1910, a majority vote chose Oklahoma City as the capital.

Legend has it that Gov. Haskell actually broke into the courthouse in Guthrie under the cover of night to steal the state seal and bring it to Oklahoma City. While we hate to ruin a great story, in all actuality, the Secretary of State brought the state seal by order of Gov. Haskell to the Huckins Hotel, making the Hotel the State Capitol of Oklahoma until the capitol building was completed in 1917. You can read a full account of the state capitol move here and here.

[Photo from Oklahoma Historical Society]

Guthrie, history, Oklahoma, Oklahoma City history
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, January 7, 2014

From Guthrie with love…

This April our great city will celebrate its 125th birthday and what a 125 years it has been. In honor of the Quasquicentennial (it is a real thing, Google it) we are going to occasionally look back on the people, places and things that have made Oklahoma City the place it is today.

Today’s history lesson is all about the Lee Huckins Hotel. The hotel was built in 1900 at the southeast corner of Main & Broadway. A lot of things make this hotel special in OKC history. The 13-floor hotel is said to have featured the city’s first electric elevator. More importantly it served (for a short time) as the capitol of Oklahoma City.

For newcomers to our state, Oklahoma City was not always the capitol of Oklahoma; nearby Guthrie takes that distinction. On June 11, 1910, voters decided to move the capitol from Guthrie to burgeoning Oklahoma City. There are all kinds of crazy folklore that says then-Governor Charles Haskell actually broke into the courthouse under the cover of night to steal the state seal and bring it to Oklahoma City.

We hate to ruin a great story but in all actuality, the Secretary of State brought the state seal by order of Gov. Haskell to the Huckins Hotel, making the Hotel the State Capitol of Oklahoma. Unfortunately, the hotel was demolished in 1971 but its colorful history lives on. You can read a full account of the state capitol move here.

[Photo from Oklahoma Historical Society]

Guthrie, history, Oklahoma City history
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
Comments (0)