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Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Spring break adventure awaits

Riversport Ropes Course

If you are looking for an action-packed way to spend your spring break, we’ve got you covered. From the thrilling adventures in the Boathouse District to the electrifying experiments at Science Museum Oklahoma, there’s no better place to beat the spring break boredom blues than OKC.

Students in grades 2-9 can have a blast during the Spring Break Ultimate Adventure Camps at OKC’s Boathouse District. They will have an opportunity to navigate roaring rapids at RIVERSPORT Rapids (opening March 11), conquer their fear of heights on the tallest adventure course of its kind in the world, speed down a 72-foot Sky Slide, free fall 80-feet on the Rumble Drop and zip line across the Oklahoma River. Sounds like a thrill-seeker’s paradise to us.

Other family-friendly ways to spend your spring break include exploring the Oklahoma City Zoo, discovering the Jurassic world that existed right here in Oklahoma at Science Museum Oklahoma or getting hands-on history during the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum’s drop-in activities. OKC MOA’s spring break camps include a variety of activities from sculpture to drawings and paintings. Myriad Botanical Gardens offers a different themed adventure each day during spring break.

Myriad Botanical Gardens, outdoor recreation, spring break, western heritage, zoo, Adventure District, arts and culture, Boathouse District, camps, museums
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Free fun in OKC

Mat Hoffman Action Sports Park

You don’t have to break the bank to have a great time in OKC. In fact, there are so many awesome free things to do, we can guarantee that spring break 2017 will be one you won’t forget.

  • Perfect your ollie, heel flip or nose slide on the bowl course or street course of Mat Hoffman Action Sports Park. Ranked in the top 10 skate parks in the U.S., the action park is certainly an OKC treasure.
  • Get closer to nature. Marvel at the outdoor paradise of the Myriad Botanical Gardens, explore more than 1,000 acres that have remained unchanged since before statehood at Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge or get hands-on with the flora and fauna at the 144-acre Martin Nature Park featuring miles of trails, a bird observation wall and watch tower.
  • Explore our heritage. Have you ever wondered what the earliest moments of our city looked like? A stunning visual representation of the first moments can be seen at the Centennial Land Run Monument near the south end of the Bricktown Canal. Learn more about our state’s heritage with a guided tour of the Oklahoma State Capitol.
  • Discover art in new places. Check out the modern art found at the historic Ford Motor Company Assembly Plant turned 21C Museum Hotel gallery. Even Travel+Leisure is taking note of this OKC gem.
  • Check out more than 1,400 items of Native American fine art, pottery, basketry, textiles and beadwork at Red Earth Museum.
  • Learn about the day that changed our city forever at the outdoor symbolic memorial of the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum. The memorial honors victims, survivors, rescuers and all who were changed by the April 19, 1995, bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building.

The Oklahoma City Visitors Guide, produced by the Oklahoma City Convention and Visitors Bureau, has more ideas for kids of all ages. Get a digital or printed copy, and start exploring OKC.

Myriad Botanical Gardens, outdoor recreation, spring break, arts and culture, family-friendly, free, history, museums
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Adventure District

Elephants at the Zoo

If there is one thing you can say about the Adventure District, it is that it lives up to its name and then some.

The Oklahoma City Zoo is one of the crown jewels of the city and features more than 1,800 animals spread over 119 acres. We recommend the Great escAPE (get it) exhibit where you can watch gorillas, orangutans and chimpanzees monkey around. This is also where you can find the Zoo Amphitheater, the premier venue for outdoor concerts in the metro.

Next door to the Zoo is Science Museum Oklahoma which has been entertaining and teaching generations of kids about science since the late 50s. If you were raised in Oklahoma City, you know all about the shadow wall. The museum is home to a must-see Science Live performance and a planetarium. Also you still have a couple of months to check out the Red Dirt Dinos exhibit. In this one-of-a-kind experience, the dinosaurs who used to roam the Sooner State come back alive.

Nearby is the world-renowned National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum where you can find exhibits on cowboy heritage and one of the largest collections of western art in the known galaxy. 

There is also fun to be had for sports fans at the ASA National Softball Hall of Fame & Museum. Not just a place for history, the Museum welcomes thousands each year for the annual Women’s College World Series.

Last, but not least, if you need a break from the kids head over to Remington Park Racing & Casino which is not only the region’s top race track, but the city’s only casino.

As you can see the Adventure District has a ton to do (even more than we listed), but if you want to see it all you are going to need more than a weekend.

nightlife, racetrack, western heritage, zoo, Adventure District, concerts, family-friendly, kids, museums
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, December 6, 2016

A tribute to the Old West

Chuck Wagon Festival

Oklahoma City’s storied past – from its shotgun-start beginning to its important role in the cattle industry – is an important part of our community’s identity. If you want to get a better historical understanding of the cowboy culture that helped drive the development of this area, visit the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum.

With multiple exhibits, art and sculpture galleries, the 17-foot-tall “End of the Trail” sculpture by James Earle Fraser and a replica of a Western town called Prosperity Junction, you’ll learn about cowboy culture and gear, Native American history, Western performers, settling the frontier and more.

The museum also organizes an annual chuck wagon gathering and children’s cowboy festival and the invitational Prix de West exhibit each year, an event that highlights the world’s best contemporary Western paintings and sculptures. While the next Prix de West is not scheduled until 2017, you can always see the past winners on display at the museum.

museums, western heritage
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, November 29, 2016

What to OKC

The view from Vast

The holiday season is in full swing and whether you are a long-time OKCer who is looking to entertain guests or a visitor checking out the city for the first time, OKC has plenty of shopping, holiday lights, museums, events and activities to keep everyone bustling.

There’s no better place to get in the holiday spirit than Oklahoma City. Here are a few of our favorite ways to introduce OKC.

  • Take a Water Taxi Along the Bricktown Canal: Enjoy the lights, sights, and sounds and get a quick introduction to Bricktown during a water taxi ride this holiday season.  Free rides are offered on designated days in November and December. Nearby in Deep Deuce, Legends Night will take place from 7 to 11 p.m. on Dec. 17 and will bring some of the best jazz musicians in OKC back to Downtown in December.
  • Gaze at 55 Feet of Beauty: 2,400 individually hand-blown glass pieces make up the Oklahoma City Museum of Art’s 55-foot Chihuly Tower, making it one of the tallest Chihuly structures in the world. In fact, Oklahoma City Museum of Art is home to one of the most comprehensive collections of Dale Chihuly glass sculptures in the world.  Art lovers will also enjoy the eclectic exhibits at 21c Hotel and Museum in OKC’s Film Row district.
  • Take a stroll through the gardens: During the holidays, the Myriad Botanical Gardens is a favorite destination among locals and visitors as they enjoy the Devon Ice Rink, Winter Shoppes and the holiday carousel. The Crystal Bridge Tropical Conservatory offers a beautiful balmy oasis featuring more than 750 varieties of plant life in two distinct climates: a tropical wet zone at the south end and a tropical dry zone at the north end.
  • Explore our history. Step back in time at the National Cowboys and Western Heritage Museum and discover the American West through one-of-a-kind exhibits, artwork and artifacts or check out the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum to learn about the day that changed our city forever.

Of course, this is just a small sampling of the fun going on here in OKC. There are so many festivals, games and activities happening in various districts, you’re sure to find an activity to appease any guest. Our friends at Visit OKC offer a plethora of ideas on how to get out and experience OKC. Learn more at visitokc.com.

museums, Myriad Botanical Gardens, retail, shopping, western heritage, arts and culture, Bricktown, Deep Deuce, downtown, holiday
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, November 8, 2016

Brush up on OKC’s military history

45th Infantry Division Museum

Because of OKC’s ongoing ties to the U.S. military, you can learn about this community’s history with the U.S. Armed Services year round.

The 45th Infantry Museum is dedicated to telling the story of the “Thunderbirds” of the 45th Infantry Division. This group of was formed during the National Defense Act of 1920 and spent their first years maintaining order in times of disaster and political unrest. Before deploying during World War II, the Thunderbirds trained at five bases, including Fort Sill in Oklahoma. They participated in four amphibious landings and saw 511 days in combat, and were described as “one of the best, if not the best division in the history of American arms” by General George S. Patton.

The Thunderbirds continued to serve after WWII until January 1969, and their legacy lives on today at the museum honoring the accomplishments of the division. Admission is free to this 27,000-square-foot attraction. Exhibits include Reaves Military Weapons Collection, which features firearms and related artifacts dating as far back as the Revolutionary War. Thunderbird Park also features tanks, artillery and aircraft onsite. 

You can also head out to the 99s Museum of Women Pilots to learn more about the history of women in aviation, including an exhibit on female military pilots. Read more about the 99s Museum here.

If the history of America’s military aviation is more to your liking, then visit the Charles B. Hall Air Park near Tinker Air Force Base on Interstate 40 East. The park is rich in the history of Tinker Air Force Base and in the aircraft that have been part of Tinker’s operations for more than seven decades.

aviation, history, military, museums, Tinker
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Step back in time

El Reno Trolley

While some may know El Reno simply for its famous annual Fried Onion Burger Day Festival, the city has quite an intriguing past.

The city was originally located about five miles north of its present location, on the banks of the North Canadian River and was known as Reno City. After the second time the town flooded, it was moved to its present location and changed its name to El Reno. Visitors can step back in time at Fort Reno, a 6,000 acre site that began as a military camp in 1874. The Officer’s Duplex now houses the U.S. Cavalry Museum and Research Library while the chapel still serves as a popular wedding site.

While you’re visiting, climb aboard the Heritage Express trolley and explore the city’s historic downtown.  And once you’ve worked up an appetite, give the onion burger a try. Sid's Diner has been lauded as having one of the nation’s best burgers by the Food Network. The restaurant has also has been featured on Man v. Food on the Travel Channel.

restaurants, day-trip, El Reno, festivals, history, museums
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Pioneers at heart

Kingfisher Seay House

Just slightly northwest of Oklahoma City you will find Kingfisher. Settled as part of the Land Run, Kingfisher has a rich history.  The city was located right on the Chisholm Trail, where millions of cows were driven from Texas to Kansas. You can learn all about this fascinating time in America’s history at the Chisholm Trail Museum. The museum features one-of-a-kind artifacts from that time period including Native American, farm and pioneer implements. While you’re visiting, check out the 89er Theater. Once a Masonic Temple, this century-old Main Street building has since been resurrected as a movie theater.

A few other interesting tidbits about Kingfisher, Walmart founder Sam Walton was born there in 1918 and the Coleman Company (think camping gear and sports equipment) was founded there in 1900.

day-trip, history, Kingfisher, movies, museums
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Distinct downtown districts

Film Row

Fancy a night out on the town or local shopping just steps away from the central business district? Oklahoma City’s downtown area is made up of districts that each have their own unique flavor and fun.

  • Bricktown - Showcasing Oklahoma City’s renaissance comes naturally to this entertainment district. The former warehouses that once housed industrial goods now offer some of Oklahoma City’s best restaurants and nightlife. The easiest way to see all this district has to offer is by way of the MAPS-funded canal. This time of year, canal rides on the Bricktown Water Taxi take place every day from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. (weather permitting).
  • Film Row - Film Row is just west of downtown and is on the cutting-edge of Oklahoma City developments. Equal parts historic and revitalized, Film Row was once home to the film distribution offices for Hollywood’s major studios. It’s now a mix of artistic businesses, locally-own restaurants and more. Be sure to check out the eclectic art collection of the recently-opened 21c Museum Hotel.
  • Automobile Alley - Located north of downtown along Broadway Avenue, Automobile Alley got its name from the number of automobile dealerships that were originally located here in the first half of the 20th century. Now local shops and restaurants make up this effortlessly walkable district. And the fact that the future Oklahoma City Streetcar will stretch through this district makes it even more exciting.
museums, nightlife, restaurants, retail, streetcar, arts and culture, Automobile Alley, Bricktown, downtown, Film Row
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Thoroughly Modern(ism)

PHOTO provided by Oklahoma City Museum of Art in anticipation of the Matisse exhibit in 2016. “Matisse in His Time: Masterworks of Modernism from the Centre ... Paris.\

[Photo provided by Oklahoma City Museum of Art © Photo CNAC/MNAM Dist. RMN - Philippe Migeat]

The Oklahoma City Museum of Modern Art will become a classroom for students of modernism during Matisse in His Time: Masterworks of Modernisn from the Centre Pompidou, Paris. Oklahoma City is the only place in North America that you can see this particular exhibit, which will provide 50 works spanning the scope of Henri Matisse’s career and 50 additional major works by Picasso, Renoir, André Derain, Georges Braque, Joan Miro and Amedeo Modigliani.

The exhibit, which is organized by Centre Pompidou, Paris (Europe’s leading museum of modern and contemporary art) and OKCMOA, will run from June 18 until Sept. 18. Members of the OKCMOA can experience an all-day member’s preview of the exhibit on Friday, June 17.

A primer for those who slept through art history class: Matisse (1869-1954) was a French artist regarded as a leading figure of modern art. Matisse was the leader of the Fauve (French for “wild beast”) movement, a critical observer of cubism and a contemporary and rival of Pablo Picasso. While he was also a draughtsman, printmaker and sculptor, he is known primarily as a painter.

arts and culture, museums
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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We (he)art OKC

Red Earth Museum

Oklahoma City’s art scene is not limited to downtown, as galleries showcasing diverse works of art are spread throughout the different districts our great city. No matter what media and style you fancy, there’s sure to be something that piques your interest.

Check out the exhibit “Summer Wheat: Pry the Lid Off” for an interesting exploration of Johannes Vermeer’s The Milkmaid at the Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center. David Steele Overholt’s audio-visual exhibit “In One Ear…” evokes nostalgia by combining overlapping video clips and a radio soundtrack broadcast of images and sounds from the 80s and 90s.  

Exhibit C, one of OKC’s newest galleries, offers an intriguing look at the talents of Chickasaws in Oklahoma.  Jewelry, pottery, paintings and clothing from Chickasaw artisans are just a small sampling of what you can expect to find here. And don’t forget to visit Red Earth Museum’s Art Center for more celebrations and explorations of Native American art and culture.

Get out and see OKC. There are plenty of cultural offerings to keep you busy and we promise you won’t be disappointed.

arts and culture, museums, western heritage
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Thunderbirds

45th Infantry Museum

One of the best ways to celebrate Memorial Day is to visit the 45th Infantry Museum. Located in the Adventure District, the museum is dedicated to telling the story of the 45th Infantry Division.

The 45th Infantry Division (nicknamed the Thunderbirds) was organized in 1923 under the National Defense Act of 1920. The guardsman saw no major action until 1941, when they were one of the first National Guard units activated for World War II. During the war, the 45th participated in four amphibious landings and fought their way across Sicily, Italy, France and Germany.

During the Sicily campaign, the unit served with General George S. Patton. The renowned general had high praise for the 45th, saying, “Your division is one of the best, if not best division in the history of American arms.” The division led the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp in Germany and the museum includes artifacts from this historic event.

The 45th was activated a second time in June of 1950 for the Korean War. The unit was one of only two National Guard divisions to see combat in the Korean War.

The 45th Infantry Division’s contribution to America is distinguished, as nine men were awarded Medals of Honor and the division sustained more than 25,000 battle casualties.

The museum is a must-visit for anyone with an interest in military history, and features a 15-acre park that holds more than 60 different types of combat vehicles. The museum is so dedicated to telling the story of the 45th that admission is free, although donations are appreciated.

Each Memorial Day the museum holds a special ceremony that begins at 10 a.m.

Adventure District, holiday, military, museums
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, May 10, 2016

All Points South

We often brag about Oklahoma City’s ideal location at two of the nation’s major arteries, Interstates 35 and 40. Sure, our equidistance between both coasts makes us a great location for business, but it also has benefits for residents, too. A quick drive south on I-35 offers plenty of sites to see and towns to enjoy. Get to know your state as you explore these southern points!

Norman
With its close ties to the University of Oklahoma, this town is a quick escape from Oklahoma City with attractions for every age. You would be remiss if you missed Norman’s museums and educational attractions, including the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History and the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. Read some of our past coverage on Norman attractions here.

Pauls Valley
Pauls Valley is home to The Toy and Action Figure Museum, one of Time Magazine’s “Top 50 Most Authentic American Experiences” and a must-see museum for the kid at heart. The Toy and Action Figure Museum houses more than 13,000 classic pop culture figures, and it’s also home to the Oklahoma Cartoonists Collection, which features Oklahoma cartoonists like Chester Gould (of Dick Tracy) and Jack and Carole Bender (from Alley Oop).

Sulphur and Davis
Just east of I-35, the towns of Sulphur and Davis are in the heart of the Chickasaw Nation and are an easy distance to the Chickasaw National Recreation Area and the Lake of the Arbuckles. The Chickasaw National Recreation Area is Oklahoma’s oldest national park and offers campsites and opportunities for biking, boating, water sports and hiking, to name a few. Nearby is the Chickasaw Cultural Center, The Artesian Hotel, Casino and Spa, the ARTesian Gallery and Studios, and Bedré Fine Chocolate Factory.

outdoor recreation, Pauls Valley, Sulphur, attractions, Davis, day-trip, museums, Norman
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, April 26, 2016

A hometown adventure

Oklahoma History Center

Today, we know Oklahoma City as a thriving, vibrant city full of fun things to do, great places to shop and world-class restaurants. You might be surprised that our city has a storied history. Born at the sound of a gunshot, Oklahoma City was settled by a historic land run involving 10,000 homesteaders on April 22, 1889. By 1900, the population had more than doubled and on November 16, 1907, Oklahoma became the 46th state.

A fun fact for all you history buffs – Oklahoma City was not always the capitol of Oklahoma; nearby Guthrie takes the distinction of being the first. On June 11, 1910, voters decided to move the capitol from Guthrie to Oklahoma City. In fact, the Secretary of State brought the state seal by order of Gov. Haskell to the Huckins Hotel, making the hotel the State Capitol of Oklahoma. Despite the hotel being demolished in 1971, its colorful history lives on. You can read a full account of the state capitol move here. The current Oklahoma State Capitol was built in 1919 at N.E. 23rd Street and Lincoln Boulevard.

These are just a few of the fun facts that you can discover on a self-guided tour of the Oklahoma History Center. Why not check it out and find out about the state’s history for yourself?

Located just northeast of downtown near the Oklahoma State Capitol, the Oklahoma History Center is a great place to explore. Check out the Smithsonian-quality exhibits and more than 2,000 artifacts which reflect the inspiring and adventurous spirit of our state. More information on museum hours and admission prices is available here.

The Oklahoma Museum of History is a division of the Oklahoma Historical Society, the keeper of the state’s history. That website is filled to the brim with information that could fill out any school history report or satisfy your curiosity about all things history Oklahoma. Explore photographs, news accounts, oral histories, records and more. It’s definitely our go-to resource for all history questions.

While you’re here, don’t miss the Red River Journey -- a walking tour of the Red River Valley.  In addition to land forms, vegetation and important historical locations, the grounds also include an outdoor oilfield exhibit complete with drilling derricks, a portable derrick and machinery associated with Oklahoma oil explorations.

And an extra fun fact – The street where the Oklahoma History Center is located is named after another well-known and respected immigrant, Dr. Nazih Zuhdi, who was born in Beirut, Lebanon, and performed Oklahoma’s first heart transplant and was a pioneer surgeon in many other ways. Read more about him here and here.

Guthrie, history, museums, Oklahoma, Oklahoma City history
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Coming together

Oklahoma City Memorial

21 years ago today, our community was forever changed and an unbreakable bond was forged among all Oklahomans. On that April day, 168 Oklahomans died when the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was bombed, in what was then the worst terrorist act on American soil.  Hundreds more were wounded and more than 12,000 volunteers and rescue workers participated in rescue efforts, recovery and support.

Out of that act, the grief and the many acts of kindness from around the world that followed the bombing came the Oklahoma City National Memorial. The Outdoor Symbolic Memorial is a beautiful and serene park that rests between two gates etched with the minute before – 9:01 a.m. – and the minute after the attack – 9:03 a.m. In between the golden-hued gates are representations of what happened at 9:02, the minute the bomb went off – 168 chairs with each victims’ name, a reflecting pool and the Survivor Tree, an American elm that miraculously survived the blast and is still growing strong.

While you’re visiting, don’t miss the chance to tour the Memorial Museum. If you haven’t ever experienced the museum, or it’s been a while since you have, we can promise it’s something you won’t soon forget. Renovated with new interactive exhibits just last year, including  ‘Investigation and Justice, survivor experiences and “Gallery of Honor” provide visitors a true sense of the magnitude of that fateful day and the search for justice that followed.  

There’s even an app containing video and audio tours for the Outdoor Symbolic Memorial and Memorial Museum. Search OKCNM in the Apple App Store and in Google Play. Tickets for the museum are $15 for adults; $12 for seniors, military personnel and students ages 6-17; and free for children ages 5 and younger.

community, museums, Oklahoma City history
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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A Run to Remember

Memorial Marathon sign

We run to remember the victims of April 19, 1995.
We run to honor the survivors and first responders.
We run to never forget.
And we run to ensure the future of the
Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum.

Each year since 2001, thousands of runners have gathered in downtown Oklahoma City to take part in the Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon. The “Run to Remember” which begins and ends near the OKC National Memorial has grown since its’ inception, now drawing more than 25,000 runners from across the U.S. as well as Japan, China, Germany and the UK. The event has even been labeled "12 Must Run Marathons" by Runner's World magazine.

From the 168 seconds of silence before the race begins to the green banners carefully hung throughout the course which pays tribute to the victims, the race is certainly not one to miss. It is a reminder of the hope, perseverance and pride in our community that grows stronger each day.

Get involved with the Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon on April 24, whether you want to support a runner, volunteer or run races of several different lengths – a full or half marathon, a relay, a 5k and even a kids marathon completed with a 1.2-mile kids’ fun run as part of the day’s festivities. The full marathon is a Boston-qualifying, USA Track and Field (USATF)-sanctioned event.

Register to runSign up to donate or form a team to raise money for the Memorial’s mission. A separate web page is for those who want to volunteer. Don’t miss the Health & Fitness Expo at the Cox Convention Center where you can pick up your race gear and other awesome swag!

If you would like to cheer on the runners, some of our favorite places include:

  • Starting line
  • Bricktown
  • State Capitol Complex
  • Edgemere Park
  • Crown Heights
  • Nichols Hills
  • Classen Boulevard
  • Finish line

The Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum is the sole beneficiary of Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon event proceeds. This is the Memorial’s largest fundraiser. To learn more about the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum, click here.

community, museums, Oklahoma City, running
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Spring break camps cater to many interests and help with child care

If you have to work or want to stay closer to Oklahoma City, sign up your child for one of the area’s many spring break programs. Here are a few ideas, both for dropping off or participating with your children:

  • The Oklahoma City Zoo offers spring break day camps for children ages 4 to 11. You can go all week or select full days or half days (cost is $45 per day from 8 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. and $25 per day for 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.). Kids will make tasty treats and deliver them each day to the animals, and the zoo will offer other ways to connect them with nature.
  • Sign your child up for Spring Break Science Camp at Science Museum Oklahoma, located in the Adventure District next to the zoo. From 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, elementary school kids will make things that fly; get dirty with chemistry, bugs and slime; play with water and more on different adventures each day. Cost for the week is $225 for members and $250 for nonmembers, but spots fill up quickly and as of this post, first through third grade slots are already full. But check out other activities at the museum as well.
  • The National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63, is offering spring break activities that include weaving, metalworking, water color and more from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. March 14-18. It is free with museum admission.
  • The Myriad Botanical Gardens in downtown Oklahoma City is offering Spring Break Pop-Ins from 10 a.m. to noon on Tuesdays and Thursdays from March 8 through 17. They’ll feature walk-up activities that include garden crafts, planting seeds or going on a scavenger hunt. Cost is a suggested $2 donation per child.
  • Oklahoma Contemporary is offering Spring Arts Camps over two sessions, March 7-11 and March 14-18, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Tuition is $170 and $40 more if your child needs an extended time there. Depending on the age and session they choose, students will create sci-fi videos, create art projects based on a space theme, explore art and music, work with clay and more.
  • The Oklahoma City Museum of Art is offering spring break arts camps from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 15-18 (Tuesday through Friday). Some are sold out, but children ages 6- to 8 can work with color and abstraction, while 9- to 12-year-olds will be photographing downtown.
  • The Lyric Theatre Thelma Gaylord Academy is offering Spring Break Theatre Camps from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 14 to 18 for the second through eighth grades. Cost is $225.
  • In the Boathouse District, kids ages 8 to 15 can take part in its Spring Break Adventure Camps either at the Oklahoma River or at Lake Overholser. A half-day option is offered at the Oklahoma River, but full days are from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Two of the city’s parks, Martin Park Nature Center and Will Rogers Gardens are offering a Natural Resources Camp on weekdays from March 7 to 18 for children ages 7 to 12. Cost is $275 for both sessions and $175 for a one-week session. Camp will run from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. The first week will be at Will Rogers Gardens, 3400 NW 36; the second at Martin Park Nature Center, 5000 W Memorial Road.
  • Finally, look into the OKC Thunder Youth Basketball Camps, which is offering basketball workshops in different locations.

If you have a favorite local hangout for you and your children, check its website for spring break activities. Oklahoma City Public Schools are out for two weeks March 9-18, so some places offer two weeks of programs. Also, the local Metro Family Magazine has an even more comprehensive list of things to do throughout the metro. You can find all kinds of things to do each month at www.visitokc.com.

downtown, kids, museums, spring break, theater, Thunder, Adventure District, western heritage, arts and culture, zoo, basketball, Boathouse District, camps
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Edmond/Arcadia

POPs

Edmond is Oklahoma City’s neighbor to the north and one of Oklahoma’s largest cities, but its location (15.2 miles from downtown and 22.6 miles from Tinker Air Force Base) allows it to be a popular suburb for people who work all across the Oklahoma City area. And thousands of students at Oklahoma Christian University and the University of Central Oklahoma call Edmond home during their academic careers. Even if you don’t live in the area, don’t miss out on all that Edmond has to offer visitors.

If you’re still in the mood for music, enjoy some soul music at the University of Central Oklahoma’s Jazz Lab. Each week, the Jazz Lab features live entertainment, and visitors can order food and drinks from Hideaway Pizza next door. During the week, across the street, you can learn about Edmond’s history at the Edmond Historical Society and Museum.

Want to spend time outdoors? Edmond offers ways to do that, too, especially with several parks. Arcadia Lake offers trails for bicycling, motorcycles and hiking/running, boat rentals and horseback riding, among other things. Edmond has a range of other parks, as well, but two big ones with lots of trails are Mitch Park and Hafer Park. In warmer weather, you can check out two water parks: The Edmond Y Water Park and Pelican Bay Aquatic Center.

Also in far north Edmond is another architectural marvel, the Armstrong Auditorium. It is a luxury venue that hosts premier concerts and performing arts, ranging from the Russian National Ballet to classical, jazz or even bluegrass music, depending on the season.

Further north and east of Edmond, the community of Arcadia will allow you to get your kicks on Route 66 here, starting with POPS, a restaurant and gas station celebrating the original interstate highway – U.S. Route 66 – and all its history as the “Main Street of America” or the “Mother Road.” You can’t miss POPS because of the 66-foot-tall soda bottle and straw that at night lights up in a dazzling show of different colors. POPS is part future, with a bold architectural design, and part past.

Just down the road from POPS is another can’t-miss landmark, the Arcadia Round Barn, which is literally a round red barn that was built in 1898 and restored in 1992. It was used as a barn for livestock and hay storage and for dances around the turn-of-the-century, and today the 45-foot-tall barn again hosts community events.

museums, outdoor recreation, parks, restaurants, Route 66, water sports, Arcadia, college, day-trip, Edmond, live music
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Stillwater

OSU

Home of Oklahoma State University, Stillwater is just an hour or so up the road from OKC and features plenty of diverse activities. Read on for more ideas on how to spend your time in Stillwater.

  • The National Wrestling Hall of Fame – this “shrine to the sport of wrestling” should definitely be on your Stillwater to-do list. Full of memorabilia and history, “mankind’s oldest and most basic form of recreational combat” is celebrated here. Learn about the sport’s pioneers, African-American and Latino wrestling history, America’s Olympic heroes, and more.
  • Main Street ShoppingDowntown Stillwater features that classic Main Street feel, with lots of local flavor and things to see and eat. Bike nights, Food Truck nights, and the Car and Bike Show augment the experience. Check the calendar at the link above to see what’s going down Downtown, or just head out and get your shop on.
  • Lake Fun – Stillwater’s three area reservoirs of regalement stand ready for you to visit any time of year. Lakes Blackwell, McMurtry, and Boomer offer all the typical lake fun you can stand and then some, including bird watching, mountain biking, hunting, disc golf, camping, horseback riding and trails for fitness, among other features.
  • Golf at Karsten Creek – The Stillwater area in general offers plenty for the duffers out there, but you may want to pay a special visit to Karsten Creek. Considered one of the best public courses in the nation, this Tom Fazio-designed course is the home of Oklahoma State’s golf teams, and you can play there too! Take the opportunity to grab your clubs and experience a demanding course you’re sure not to forget.

For more info, just hop over to www.visitstillwater.org.

mountain biking, museums, outdoor recreation, retail, Stillwater, water sports, camping, college, day-trip, food, golf
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Adventure District

If there were an award for the most properly named district in the 4-0-5, the Adventure District would probably win. The aptly-named section of the city is home to more family fun than you can shake a stick at.

The Oklahoma City Zoo is one of the crown jewels of the city and features more than 1,800 animals spread over 119 acres. We recommend the Great escAPE (get it) exhibit where you can watch gorillas, orangutans and chimpanzees monkey around. This is also where you can find the Zoo Amphitheater, the premier venue for outdoor concerts in the metro.

Next door to the Zoo is Science Museum Oklahoma which has been entertaining and teaching generations of kids about science since the late 50s. If you were raised in Oklahoma City you know all about the shadow wall. The museum is home to a must-see Science Live performance and a planetarium.

Nearby is the world-renowned National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum where you can find exhibits on cowboy heritage and one of the largest collections of western art in the known galaxy.

There is also fun to be had for sports fans at the ASA National Softball Hall of Fame & Museum. Not just a place for history, the Museum welcomes thousands each year for the annual Women’s College World Series.

Last, but not least, if you need a break from the kids head over to Remington Park Racing & Casino which is not only the region’s top race track but the city’s only casino.

As you can see the Adventure District has a ton to do (even more than we listed) but if you want to see it all you are going to need more than a weekend.

museums, racetrack, western heritage, zoo, Adventure District, arts and culture, family-friendly, kids, live sporting events
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Learn more about OKC’s military history

display at the 45th Infantry Museum

Veterans Day may only occupy one day on the calendar, but in Oklahoma City you can learn about this community’s military history year round.

Did you know there have been two different USS Oklahoma City ships? There is currently a submarine christened the USS Oklahoma City that served in the Persian Gulf. There was also a light cruiser named the USS Oklahoma City with an interesting history that served in World War II and the Vietnam War. 

Want to experience a more hands on history of the military? Visit the 45th Infantry Museum, which is dedicated to telling the story of the “Thunderbirds” of the 45th Infantry Division. This group of was formed during the National Defense Act of 1920 and spent their first years maintaining order in times of disaster and political unrest. Before deploying during World War II, the Thunderbirds trained at five bases, including Fort Sill in Oklahoma. They participated in four amphibious landings and saw 511 days in combat, and were described as “one of the best, if not the best division in the history of American arms” by General George S. Patton.     

The Thunderbirds continued to serve after WWII until January 1969, and their legacy lives on today at the museum honoring the accomplishments of the division. Admission is free to this 27,000-square-foot attraction.

You can also head out to the 99s Museum of Women Pilots to learn more about the history of women in aviation. One of the best exhibits includes features on female military pilots. Read more about the 99s Museum here.

If the history of America’s military aviation is more to your liking, then visit the Charles B. Hall Air Park  near Tinker Air Force Base on Interstate 40 East. The park is rich in the history of Tinker Air Force Base and in the aircrafts that have been part of Tinker’s operations for more than seven decades. 

history, military, museums
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Honoring those who served

45th Infantry Museum Veterans Day ceremony

Events across Oklahoma City will give you plenty of opportunities to celebrate America’s armed forces and honor those who have served. If you know of any events we didn’t mention please include them in the comments or give us a shout of Facebook or Twitter:

  • Oklahoma City Symphonic Band ConcertAt 7:30 p.m. on Nov. 10, the Oklahoma City Symphonic Band will present “A Veterans Day Salute!” concert honoring American veterans. The concert will feature Sousa marches and a special presentation of the Armed Forces salute. View okcband.org for more information.
  • Veterans Day service at the 45th Infantry Division MuseumOn Nov. 11 at 10 a.m., pay tribute to the men and women of the military at this patriotic ceremony, which includes a helicopter flyover, massing of the colors, patriotic music selections from the 145th Army Band and guest speakers.
  • Midwest City Veterans Day ParadeMidwest City will hold their annual Veterans Day Parade on Nov. 11 at 10 a.m. In addition to area marching bands and floats, a warbird flyover will take place during the parade.
holiday, live music, military, museums, parade
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, November 3, 2015

Find your own adventure in Oklahoma City

Stingray Bay at the Zoo - Adventure District

This week on The Better Life Blog we’re going to go exploring in some of Oklahoma City’s districts that offer local flair to appeal to various interests, whether those interests tend towards artsy, uptown and up-and-coming, historical, family-friendly and outdoorsy. While multiple unique districts that reflect the city’s culture have been redeveloped and polished in recent years, this week we’ll focus on three of them – the Adventure District, the Plaza District and Uptown 23.

If you’re coming to Oklahoma City for a visit or are just moving here, chances are the Adventure District is one of the first places you’ll visit. Start with some of our more visible attractions, even if you don’t yet call the collection of attractions in that area by that name.

Located at the crossroads of Interstates 35 and 44, the Adventure District offers outdoor and indoor attractions for all ages. Here are a few things you can do there:

And here’s an old-but-new attraction that you might not know about – The American Pigeon Museum and Library, 2300 NE 63. It initially formed in 1973 as the American Homing Pigeon Institute and purchased the land where it is now. But its new facility opened in 2014 and has since welcomed visitors from around the world with its collections of art, history, memorabilia and more celebrating the American homing pigeon.

While you’re there, visit some of the Adventure District’s partners nearby, including the Gaylord-Pickens Oklahoma Heritage Museum, 1400 Classen Drive, and the historic Harn Homestead Museum, 1721 N Lincoln Blvd., both places where you can learn more about Oklahoma heritage, territorial life and its people’s pioneering spirit; and Lincoln Park Golf Course, 4001 NE Grand Blvd., for tournament-level golf at one of two 18-hole championship courses.

Uptown 23, western heritage, zoo, Adventure District, family-friendly, golf, museums, Plaza District
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Museum Madness

Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art

Whether you’ve recently developed a large hole in your pocket, learned the hard way the downside to a “put it all in lottery scratch-offs” investment strategy, or you just plain lost your ATM card, sometimes you wanna have loads of fun without spending commensurate loads of cash. It’s cool – being thrifty is nifty, arewerite? This week, we’re all about free fun in OKC.

Let’s get started with a bang and “just a glass of water, thank you.” Did you know that you can visit some of our area museums for the price of air?

Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art – located on the OU campus in Norman, “The Fred” is known for its collection of French Impressionism, featuring works by Van Gogh, Degas, Renoir, Monet, Pissaro, Vuillard and others, in addition to fantastic collections of 20th-century American (O’Keeffe, Hopper, Davis), Native American and Southwestern art. And the best part? Admission is now free for all, thanks to an annual $60,000 gift from the OU Athletics Department.

Hours & Admission Info: www.ou.edu/fjjma/visit.html

National Softball Hall of Fame and Museum – Located in OKC’s Adventure District, the Softball Hall of Fame and Museum celebrates the greatest players in the sport’s history and their accomplishments, and history of the game. Located on the grounds of ASA Hall of Fame Stadium, the museum is a must-visit for softball players, aficionados or even casual fans.

Hours & Admission Info: www.teamusa.org/usa-softball/about/national-softball-hall-of-fame

45th Infantry Division Museum - Another Adventure District favorite, the 45th Infantry Museum features one of the country’s largest collections of military firearms in addition to plenty of WWII and Korean War artifacts, in addition to info and artifacts from other major conflicts. The museum commemorates the 45th Infantry Division and 45th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (aka “Thunderbirds”), an Oklahoma Army National Guard major formation from 1920 to 1968 and modular infantry brigade team since, respectively. Another cool part of the 45th Museum is the large military vehicle/equipment displays outside, with ‘copters, planes, tanks, transports and more available to check out!

Hours & Admission Info: 45thdivisionmuseum.com/

Red Earth Museum– Located downtown, the Red Earth Museum features more than you might think (especially if you’re thinking it’s just a museum full of various red clay soils—that would be madness). No, this museum is chock-full of fantastic Native American art items of all types, from pottery, beadwork and basketry to fine arts and textiles. Its “mission is to promote the rich traditions of American Indian arts and cultures through education, a premier festival, a museum and fine art markets,” and is definitely worth checking out the next time you’re downtown.

Hours & Admission Info: www.redearth.org/red-earth-museum/visiting-information

Adventure District, arts and culture, free, museums, western heritage
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, October 13, 2015

In OKC, our Western roots run deep

Children learing at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum

Oklahoma City’s storied past – from its shotgun-start beginning to its important role in the cattle industry – is an important part of our community’s identity. If you want to get a better historical understanding of the cowboy culture that helped drive the development of this area, visit the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum.

The museum is considered “America’s premier institution of Western history, art and culture.” You’ll realize the description is an accurate one as you wander through its multiple art and sculpture galleries, stand in front of the poignant 17-foot-tall “End of the Trail” sculpture by James Earle Fraser (which is 100 years old this month) or explore a replica of a Western town for children, called Prosperity Junction, and the Children’s Cowboy Corral. You’ll learn about cowboy culture and gear, Native American history, Western performers, settling the frontier and more.

The museum also organizes an annual chuck wagon gathering and children’s cowboy festival (the next one is scheduled for May 2016). The museum hosts the invitational Prix de West exhibit each year, an event that highlights the world’s best contemporary Western paintings and sculptures. While the next Prix de West is not scheduled until 2016, you can always see the past winners on display at the museum.

museums, western heritage
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Invite your out-of-town friends to play in OKC

Bricktown Canal

Whether you’ve just moved here or lived here a long time, you can pitch Oklahoma City as a great destination for visitors to your out-of-town friends, and we at The Better Life Blog are happy to help tell them why.

After all, this year National Geographic named Oklahoma City as a “must-see,” “go-now” destination in its Best Trips 2015 list for good reason.

Here are some ideas for your own adventure:

  • Oklahoma City has a collection of truly world-class and won’t-see-them-anywhere else museums that will keep you busy for days. The Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum is a must-visit for anyone who comes to our community. The National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum and Oklahoma City Art Museum should also be at the top of any to-do list. Get a comprehensive list of all the great OKC museums here.
  • Rent a kayak or stand-up paddle board, go zip lining across the Oklahoma River on the SandRidge Sky Zip or climb the six-story SandRidge Sky Trail at the Boathouse District, where next year, you’ll also be able to enjoy outdoor whitewater rafting on a course that’s under construction and scheduled to open in 2016. Find out more from RIVERSPORT Adventures.
  • Go to Oklahoma City’s Adventure District and tour the Oklahoma City Zoo, the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum, Science Museum Oklahoma, or watch horse racing at Remington Park Racing and Casino.
  • Explore the city’s other districts and local shopping and dining. Get outside at Lake Hefner, Lake Overholser, in the Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge, or at one of the many city parks, such as Martin Park Nature Center, a 140-acre park that feels like an escape from urban life. The Myriad Botanical Gardens are also a treat, whether you stay in the outside gardens, attend an event there or tour the rainforest atmosphere inside the Crystal Bridge Tropical Conservatory.

There is plenty more in Oklahoma City to see and do. So sell your out-of-town friends on Oklahoma City as a place to visit. You’ll get to see them on a regular basis and make good memories with all that this place has to offer.

If you need additional help with the sell (and we don’t think you will), tell them that this year Travel and Leisure Magazine recently named Oklahoma City as the fifth friendliest city in America.

Start planning your trip online at www.visitokc.com and get more ideas by exploring The Better Life Blog.

museums, Myriad Botanical Gardens, outdoor recreation, parks, shopping, water sports, Adventure District, western heritage, arts and culture, zoo, attractions, family-friendly, food
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, August 25, 2015

I got 99 problems but a museum ain’t one

Amelia Earhart Pilots License

We’ve already told you a little bit about OKC’s connection to aviation in both the past and present, but if you want to learn more, Oklahoma City’s 99s Museum of Women Pilots will give you a glimpse into an important part of aviation history. Named for the 99 women pilots who signed the original membership charter in 1929, the Ninety-Nines is an international organization of women pilots. Their museum, located near Will Rogers World Airport, celebrates the inspiring history of female aviators from the early days of airplanes to the women of space exploration.

The museum houses a large collection of artifacts that belonged to the one of the most recognizable female pilots: Amelia Earhart. Earhart was the first elected president of the organization, and the museum houses her original pilot’s license alongside other personal effects. Other exhibits include a feature on female military pilots from WWII to today.

aviation, museums
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Stop in Prague, but don’t pronounce it like the Czech capital

We at The Better Life tend to spend most of our time exploring all the great things to do in the immediate Oklahoma City area but it’s always fun to venture out a bit and explore the area’s sites and history. Last week we took you on a trip west of the metro. This week, we’re going to explore to the east, starting with Prague, so here is a rundown, ready for you to Czech out.

OK, so that phrase is a little corny and cliché, but it’s true. Like Yukon, the community is home to many Oklahomans with Czech heritage, even if they pronounce the town’s name with a long “a” instead of like a short “o” as they do in the Czech Republic’s capital in Europe. Make plans now to attend the town’s annual Kolache Festival, held in May, and see the Czechs in action – with food, dance, music and more.

Prague developed after the Land Run of 1891 opened the Sac and Fox Reservation for settlement and a mother and her son settled there from Austria, according to the city’s website. Its formal beginning as a town named Prague dates back to 1902. Read more online there, but moving into the present, there’s plenty to do and see.

First, visit Prague City Lake, a 400-acre lake that includes a boat ramp, boat docks, picnic areas, volleyball court and playground. For hours and usage fees, go online. It is surrounded by the Prague Lake Trail, which features 30 miles of hiking, biking and equestrian trails, although you have to bring your own horse.

You can also play golf at the nine-hole Prague Municipal Golf Course, 1112 N Ayars, or learn more about the Czech pioneers who settled there at the Prague Historical Museum, 1008 Jim Thorpe Blvd. 

The Prague Historical Museum tells the history of Czech pioneers who founded Prague in 1902 through interpretive exhibits, artifacts and early-day business displays. A portion of the museum also features memorabilia from Olympic athlete and Prague native Jim Thorpe. His birthplace is also marked at the Jim Thorpe Birth Site, 8601 NBU, where he was born on May 2, 1887.

And those who are Catholic or seeking answers to prayers can visit the National Shrine of the Infant Jesus of Prague at St. Wenceslaus Catholic Church. Nearly 70 years ago, a statue of the Infant Jesus of Prague (a replica of a 16th-century one) arrived at the church, and many believers have felt their prayers to the Infant Jesus answered there ever since. Thousands of people visit the shrine each year. Read more about the church’s history dating back to 1899 and that of the shrine. Or visit yourself.

water sports, day-trip, golf, museums, outdoor recreation, religion
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Shawnee’s diverse history includes Native Americans and French monks

The City of Shawnee has its own charm and history and it’s big enough (more than 30,000 people in 2013) to have a small regional airport. But there are plenty of reasons to drive west on Interstate 40 to visit Shawnee.

While you’re there, stop at the Mabee-Gerrer Museum of Art and see its Egyptian, Greek and Roman objects; Renaissance art from the early 20th century; and other cultural artifacts. It is home to Oklahoma’s only Egyptian mummy. Founded in 1919, the museum is affiliated with Catholic-affiliated St. Gregory’s University, which developed because of the value that two Benedictine monks placed on education in what was then Indian Territory more than 100 years ago. These monks, Dom Isidore Robot and Frere Dominic Lambert, moved to the area from France in 1875 and immediately started education programs under the Sacred Heart Mission.

Don’t miss a stop by the Cultural Heritage Center of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, which has its headquarters in Shawnee. The heritage center even includes an eagle aviary – a home to injured eagles rescued from the wild that cannot be rehabilitated and released. Tours of the aviary are available by appointment, but you can stop by the heritage center’s museum to see cultural and contemporary objects presenting the Native American tribe’s history. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

What served as the Santa Fe Train Depot from 1902 and served as a train station until 1973 now serves as the home of the Pottawatomie County Museum and Historical Society. Visitors can learn about the area’s history, including more about the country’s railroad and transportation history. Near the museum is the current home of Shawnee’s first building, a home known as the Beard Cabin, built after the land run in 1891.

And finally, on the Shawnee Board of Directors’ website to promote area tourism, www.visitshawnee.com, are two must-see sites that sound quite intriguing:

  • For the water gardening fans, the Pond Pro Shop has streams, waterfalls, fountains and ponds to help you design, build and maintain your backyard pond.
  • If you have children and want to venture a little further from Shawnee – about 20 miles to the southeast – don’t miss the Jasmine Moran Children’s Museum in Seminole.
western heritage, arts and culture, day-trip, family-friendly, gardening, museums
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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Tuesday, July 14, 2015

You Must Mustang

Located adjacent to OKC to the southwest, Mustang was first settled during the 1889 land run and was named for Mustang Creek, which flows just north of town. The Mustang Historical Museum pays tribute to these early days of Mustang and OKC with exhibits featuring pioneer artifacts and garb, agriculture and ranching items, a scale model one-room schoolhouse, and even the original Mustang Jail from the 1960s. Mustang also holds the annual Western Days festival, this year on Sept. 11-12. Join about 30,000 other folks enjoying a parade, a chili cook-off, a car show, arts and crafts, local entertainment, the Western Stampede Run, a rodeo and more during this time-honored celebration of the pioneer and western spirit.

day-trip, festivals, museums, Oklahoma
Posted by: Greater Oklahoma City Chamber
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